Has your child recently completed their SATs? Are you now looking at their results questioning if they are ‘good’ or not? I have had many a similar conversation with parents over the last few weeks. Emails that say my child got this – is it good? What is average?

This blog is here to help you understand your child’s results and what this means for them going forwards.

The Facts

Firstly, The SATs tests are marked at the end of May and early June. All results are collated, and the government looks at what is the average score based on the overall mark for each paper. These are then converted into conversion tables where each mark is given a standardise score.

The average score is always 100, any below this is deemed to be at ‘not an age-related level’ and above this ‘greater depth’. However, I have seen many children score, just below the standard 100 mark and they are equally as capable as those children who reached the average score.

Why are SATs important?

SATs are used to monitor the progress of children during their primary school years. It is also a way of checking that they are learning the government set syllabus and meeting what ‘experts’ deem to be the appropriate knowledge at this age. Furthermore, the SATs test results are used to group children in secondary school and predict their GCSE results. Therefore, if your child scored a 100 in the SATs then they would be expected to get a 4 or 5 (the old C grade) at GCSE. If your child scored higher than 100 then it indicates their potential for a higher GCSE grade.

However, this is not always the case as a lot can happen in our lives between the ages of 11 and 16 and any number of events could hinder their learning. Furthermore, on the other side of this some children may not reach their full potential until their secondary years and then suddenly develop an interest and love of learning consequently achieving higher than maybe originally predicted.

In Conclusion

The SATs have always been a highly controversial topic but if your child took them this year, understanding them and their successes is extremely important, so I hope this information has helped to enlightened you.

The Conversion Table

This table below shows the raw score against the scaled score. 100, in the Scaled Score column, is considered to be average.

Reading Raw score

Scaled score Mathematics Raw score Scaled score Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar Raw score

Scaled score

0 – 2 No scaled score 0 – 2 No scaled score 0 – 2 No scaled score
3 80 3 80 3 80
4 80 4 80 4 80
5 80 5 80 5 81
6 82 6 81 6 82
7 83 7 82 7 83
8 84 8 82 8 84
9 85 9 83 9 85
10 86 10 84 10 86
11 87 11 84 11 87
12 88 12 85 12 87
13 89 13 85 13 88
14 89 14 86 14 89
15 90 15 86 15 89
16 91 16 87 16 90
17 92 17 87 17 90
18 92 18 88 18 91
19 93 19 88 19 92
20 94 20 89 20 92
21 95 21 89 21 93
22 95 22 89 22 93
23 96 23 90 23 94
24 97 24 90 24 94
25 97 25 91 25 94
26 98 26 91 26 95
27 99 27 91 27 95
28 100 28 92 28 96
29 100 29 92 29 96
30 101 30 92 30 97
31 102 31 92 31 97
32 102 32 93 32 98
33 103 33 93 33 98
34 104 34 93 34 99
35 105 35 94 35 99
36 106 36 94 36 100
37 106 37 94 37 100
38 107 38 95 38 100
39 108 39 95 39 101
40 109 40 95 40 101
41 110 41 95 41 102
42 111 42 96 42 102
43 113 43 96 43 103
44 114 44 96 44 103
45 115 45 96 45 104
46 117 46 97 46 104
47 118 47 97 47 105
48 120 48 97 48 106
49 120 49 97 49 106
50 120 50 98 50 107
51 98 51 107
52 98 52 108
53 98 53 109
54 99 54 109
55 99 55 110
56 99 56 111
57 99 57 111
58 100 58 112
59 100 59 113
60 100 60 114
61 100 61 115
62 101 62 116
63 101 63 117
64 101 64 118
65 101 65 119
66 101 66 120
67 102 67 120
68 102 68 120
69 102 69 120
70 102 70 120
71 103
72 103
73 103
74 103
75 104
76 104
77 104
78 105
79 105
80 105
81 105
82 106
83 106
84 106
85 106
86 107
87 107
88 107
89 108
90 108
91 108
92 109
93 109
94 109
95 110
96 110
97 110
98 111
99 111
100 112
101 112
102 113
103 113
104 114
105 115
106 116
107 117
108 118
109 120
110 120